1. 11 Apr, 2008 1 commit
  2. 07 Apr, 2008 10 commits
  3. 03 Apr, 2008 1 commit
  4. 02 Apr, 2008 3 commits
    • Jean-Christophe PLAGNIOL-VILLARD's avatar
      MPC8xx: Fix libfdt support introduced in commit 77ff7b74 · c2a545ce
      Jean-Christophe PLAGNIOL-VILLARD authored
      
      
      fdt.c: In function 'ft_cpu_setup':
      fdt.c:33: warning: implicit declaration of function 'do_fixup_by_prop_u32'
      fdt.c:39: warning: implicit declaration of function 'do_fixup_by_compat_u32'
      fdt.c:43: warning: implicit declaration of function 'fdt_fixup_ethernet'
      fdt.c:45: warning: implicit declaration of function 'fdt_fixup_memory'
      Signed-off-by: default avatarJean-Christophe PLAGNIOL-VILLARD <plagnioj@jcrosoft.com>
      c2a545ce
    • Andy Fleming's avatar
      Fix fdt set command to conform to dts spec · 4abd844d
      Andy Fleming authored
      
      
      The fdt set command was treating properties specified as <00> and <0011>
      as byte streams, rather than as an array of cells.  As we already have
      syntax for expressing the desire for a stream of bytes ([ xx xx ...]),
      we should use the <> syntax to describe arrays of cells, which are always
      32-bits per element.  If we imagine this likely (IMHO) scenario:
      
      > fdt set /ethernet-phy@1 reg <1>
      
      With the old code, this would create a bad fdt, since the reg cell would be
      made to be one byte in length.  But the cell must be 4 bytes, so this would
      break mysteriously.
      
      Also, the dts spec calls for constants inside the angle brackets (<>)
      to conform to C constant standards as they pertain to base.
      Take this scenario:
      
      > fdt set /ethernet@f00 reg <0xe250000\ 0x1000>
      
      The old fdt command would complain that it couldn't parse that.  Or, if you
      wanted to specify that a certain clock ran at 33 MHz, you'd be required to
      do this:
      
      > fdt set /mydev clock <1f78a40>
      
      Whereas the new code will accept decimal numbers.
      
      While I was in there, I extended the fdt command parser to handle property
      strings which are split across multiple arguments:
      
      > fdt set /ethernet@f00 interrupts < 33 2 34 2 36 2 >
      > fdt p /ethernet@f00
      ethernet@f00 {
      	interrupts = <0x21 0x2 0x22 0x2 0x24 0x2>;
      };
      
      Lastly, the fdt print code was rearranged slightly to print arrays of cells
      if the length of the property is a multiple of 4 bytes, and to not print
      leading zeros.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndy Fleming <afleming@freescale.com>
      4abd844d
    • Stefan Roese's avatar
      ppc4xx: Canyonlands: Init SATA/PCIe port correctly · 1c2926ab
      Stefan Roese authored
      
      
      Canyonlands (460EX) shares the first PCIe interface with the SoC SATA
      interface. This usage can be configured with the jumper J6. This patch
      correctly configures the SATA/PCIe PHY for SATA usage when this jumper
      is installed.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarStefan Roese <sr@denx.de>
      1c2926ab
  5. 01 Apr, 2008 4 commits
  6. 31 Mar, 2008 21 commits